Binsey Poplars

Binsey Poplars

Gerard Manley Hopkins

The poplars were felled in 1879. My Latin..
Binsey Poplars
My aspens dear, whose airy cages quelled, Quelled or quenched in leaves the leaping sun, All felled, felled, are all felled; Of a fresh and following folded rank Not spared, not one That dandled a sandalled Shadow that swam or sank On meadow & river & wind-wandering weed-winding bank. O if we but knew what we do When we delve or hew — Hack and rack the growing green! Since country is so tender To touch, her being só slender, That, like this sleek and seeing ball But a prick will make no eye at all, Where we, even where we mean To mend her we end her, When we hew or delve: After-comers cannot guess the beauty been. Ten or twelve, only ten or twelve Strokes of havoc unselve The sweet especial scene, Rural scene, a rural scene, Sweet especial rural scene. [Campaigning against a housing estate that would have scarred the view of Highgate from Hampstead Heath, I wrote: 'Witan, the ancient council. Hurst, a wooded hill. Not since the Binsey Poplars, those Hopkins-harrowing topplers, Fell or were felled by the fiend of eld that wishes old England ill, And the trains stopped stopping at Adlestrop, and at Grantchester time stood still, Has anything worse been heard in verse, including, if you will, The nefarious, unhilarious, Dissolution of Halnaker Mill.' ...]
Binsey Poplars
o quantum amatae vos mihi populi! Titana textis frondibus obrui ~~vidi refrenarique in auris; ~~~~praecipites cecidistis omnes, haud una sospes caede trucissima. intactus ordo duplicis agminis ~~occisus, umbrosis puellas ~~~~vel pueros recreare alutis gnarus, per agros, flumina, flamina, ventos vagantes, litora, harundines ~~per prata procurvas, per undas ~~~~nantibus his, aliis caducis. o stirps molesti nescia criminis, prompta ad fodendum, scindere promptior! ~~~torquemus increscens, virescens ~~~~ dilaniamus, in omne damnum. rus tenue tactu, rus tenerum ambitu! levis videndi fixus acu globus: ~~ instanter, heu! non est ocellus. ~~~~sic etiam reparare nisi pala et securi, deruimus modo saltus amoenos : nesciet advena ~~quantum venustatis fuisset: ~~~~undecimus decimusve tantum stragi sat ictus: conficit eripit prospectum agrestem, gaudia rustica ~~dejecta: prospectum placentem ~~~~destruit egregium, placentem.
Classical Verse Challenge for April 2024.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Gerard Manley Hopkins...

Hibernia nostra

Let Erin Remember

My Latin
Let Erin Remember
Let Erin remember the days of old, Ere her faithless sons betray'd her; When Malachi wore the collar of gold, Which he won from her proud invader, When her kings, with standard of green unfurl'd, Led the Red-Branch Knights to danger! Ere the emerald gem of the western world Was set in the crown of a stranger. On Lough Neagh's bank as the fisherman strays, When the clear cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days In the wave beneath him shining: Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, Catch a glimpse of the days that are over; Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time, For the long-faded glories they cover.
Hibernia nostra
tempora lapsa diu memorentur, Hibernia nostra, queis te tradiderat nondum tua perfida proles. supremum regem signaverat aurea torques, invasore truci victorem in lite superbo: tempore quo viridi regum vexilla colore audendis equites rutilos duxere periclis, Hesperiae necdum Smaragditia gemma iacebat capta per externos, aliena inserta corona. est lacus insignis: ripa piscator in alta, solis ad occasum deerrans per frigus et umbram, viderit antiquas torres praestare rotundas, surgere fulgentes et aqua lucere profunda. sic etiam referent sublimia somnia menti grandia tempora, lapsorum simulacra dierum: vanescunt refugis aevis moribunda per undas, in queis iamdudum se pristina gloria condit.
Sung by Michael O’Duffy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtPsezf6qn0

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

DO RE MI

DO RE MI

English by Oscar Hammerstein II from 'The Sound of Music'. Latin by me.
DO RE MI
Let's start at the very beginning A very good place to start When you read, you begin with A-B-C When you sing, you begin with Do-Re-Mi Do, a deer, a female deer Re, a drop of golden sun Mi, a name, I call myself Fa, a long, long way to run So, a needle pulling thread La, a note to follow So Ti, a drink with jam and bread That will bring us back to Do. When you know the notes to sing You can sing most anything.
DO RE MI
incipiamus in incepto: valet optima origo. ~~alpha et beta legis, mox quoque gamma notas. imus cerva gradus, muliebris bestia, chordis; ~~aureolo sequitur guttula sole, iubar. tum mihi me nomen, quo me revocante vocabor; ~~currere fas longe, cui via longa, procul. dein sutoris acus, trahitur cum sutile filum; ~~excipiens caecus proximus instat acum. dein thea adest, pani coctis cum fructibus apta; ~~cerva iterum inventa conficiemus iter. tempore quo disces septem discrimina vocum, ~~omnia quam sollers carmina paene canes!
in pratis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drnBMAEA3AM in stratis: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLm07s8fnzM

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI

Death and The Maiden: an Acrostic

Bethany W Pope (1995)

The poet’s acrostic project involves “four deconstructed acrostic sestinas, twenty-four double-acrostic sonnets, and an acrostic specular. The story is orphic.” This is the acrostic specular at the centre of her project.
Death and The Maiden: an Acrostic
In the house of Death pain and pleasure are one. Never mind the face he wears; those bare sockets, that sharp grin. Grasp him, hard. Push against those jutting hip bones. In this tangle of sheets (scented with sex and rot) Reason dissolves like bone in acid, revealing something else Under the mask. There is something beautiful, Madness, perhaps, or possibly truth. In the joyful agony of this moment a revelation blooms. Muscles crowd in to cover the bone. Naked, Under a sheen of silk and lily-dew, Skeletal hands clutch fat, round paps. Nearing the threshold of something unspeakable, Open your eyes; behold your lover. Tension Contorts the fibers of your heart. Trembling limbs threaded together; a blissful arrhythmia. Even Death can learn the pleasure of a shudder. Even Death can learn the pleasure of a shudder. Trembling limbs threaded together; a blissful arrhythmia Contorts the fibers of your heart. Open your eyes. Behold your lover; tension. Nearing the threshold of something unspeakable, Skeletal hands clutch fat, round paps. Under a sheen of silk and lily-dew, Muscles crowd in to cover the bone. Naked In the joyful agony of this moment, a revelation blooms. Madness, perhaps, or possibly truth. Under the mask there is something beautiful. Reason dissolves like bone in acid, revealing something else. In this tangle of sheets (scented with sex and rot) Grasp him, hard. Push against those jutting hip bones; Never mind the face he wears. Those bare sockets; that sharp grin. In the house of Death pain and pleasure are one.
IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI
In Mortis aede mel dolor, fel gaudium. Ne terreant te rictus, orbes, os grave: Grande prehendas, pelvis ossa comprimas. Instat libido putris in linis odor. Recincta mens ut ossa aceto: ostenditur, Ut excidit persona, pulchritudinis Merum, et furoris, veritatis omina. In his doloris gaudiis mens certior: Miscentur ossi muscula et nuda omnia: Udis sub ortus palliis cum lilio Surgunt papillae quas premunt durae manus. Nefanda sunt propinqua: vade ad limina! Orbes recludens ipsum amatorem vide! Cordis toros contorquet incitatio. Tremunt beati ardoris artus artubus. Et Mors voluptatem tremoris excipit. Et Mors voluptatem tremoris excipit. Tremunt beati ardoris artus artubus. Cordis toros contorquet incitatio. Orbes recludens ipsum amatorem vide! Nefanda sunt propinqua: vade ad limina! Surgunt papillae quas premunt durae manus. Udis sub ortus palliis cum lilio Miscentur ossi muscula et nuda omnia: In his doloris gaudiis mens certior: Merum, et furoris, veritatis omina, Ut excidit persona, pulchritudinis. Recincta mens ut ossa aceto ostenditur. Instat libido putris in linis odor. Grande prehendas, pelvis ossa comprimas. Ne terreant te rictus, orbes, os grave: In Mortis aede mel dolor, fel gaudium.
Death And The Maiden

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Bethany W Pope...

Auden ipse scripsi

Oh where are you going

W.H. Auden (1907-73)

Oh where are you going
"O where are you going?" said reader to rider, "That valley is fatal where furnaces burn, Yonder's the midden whose odours will madden, That gap is the grave where the tall return." "O do you imagine," said fearer to farer, "That dusk will delay on your path to the pass, Your diligent looking discover the lacking, Your footsteps feel from granite to grass?" "O what was that bird," said horror to hearer, "Did you see that shape in the twisted trees? Behind you swiftly the figure comes softly, The spot on your skin is a shocking disease." "Out of this house"---said rider to reader, "Yours never will"---said farer to fearer "They're looking for you"---said hearer to horror, As he left them there, as he left them there.
Auden ipse scripsi
sic equiti loquitur lector: ‘quo vadere velles? ~~vallis enim vivis ignibus illa necat. est fimus, infesti qua te furiabit odores; ~~in spatio tumulus, qua redit altus, hiat.’ sic pavidus: ‘peregrine’ inquit ‘cito faucibus instans! ~~num tentant tenebrae mox moderare moras? num vigil invenies vacui vestigia visu? ~~num, si stant lapides, mulserit herba pedes?’ ‘qualis avis fuit, auditor?’ modo dixerat horror: ~~‘arboribus tortis nonne patebat avis? te sequitur pede pernici furtiva figura; ~~in cute gutta tua desidet, atra lues.’ lectori sed eques: ‘proficiscere, tecta relinquas.’ ~~‘nec tibi pes...’ pavido sic peregrinus ait. auditor: ‘peteris!’ petiturque, ut dixerat, horror. ~~ille ibi liquit eos, ille ibi liquit eos.
Auden’s voice: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFQjnqV_byA Ned Rorem’s music: https://www.newworldrecords.org/products/ned-rorem-evidence-of-things-not-seen See also my lipogram.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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Doggerel by a Senior Citizen

Categories
Latin

From: Doggerel by a Senior Citizen

W.H. Auden (1907-73)

Dare any call Permissiveness An educational success? Saner those class-rooms which I sat in, Compelled to study Greek and Latin.
Doggerel by a Senior Citizen
Latin by Timothy Adès: profuit, heu! puero discenda licentia nulli: sanius, heu! linguae, Graece, Latine, tuae.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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A Subaltern’s Love Song

A Subaltern’s Love Song

Sir John Betjeman (1906-84)

A Subaltern’s Love Song
Miss J Hunter Dunn, Miss J Hunter Dunn, Furnish'd and burnish'd by Aldershot sun, What strenuous singles we played after tea, We in the tournament - you against me! Love-thirty, love-forty, oh! weakness of joy, The speed of a swallow, the grace of a boy, With carefullest carelessness, gaily you won, I am weak from your loveliness, Joan Hunter Dunn. Miss Joan Hunter Dunn, Miss Joan Hunter Dunn, How mad I am, sad I am, glad that you won. The warm-handled racket is back in its press, But my shock-headed victor, she loves me no less. Her father's euonymus shines as we walk, And swing past the summer-house, buried in talk, And cool the verandah that welcomes us in To the six-o'clock news and a lime-juice and gin. The scent of the conifers, sound of the bath, The view from my bedroom of moss-dappled path, As I struggle with double-end evening tie, For we dance at the Golf Club, my victor and I. On the floor of her bedroom lie blazer and shorts And the cream-coloured walls are be-trophied with     sports, And westering, questioning settles the sun On your low-leaded window, Miss Joan Hunter Dunn. The Hillman is waiting, the light's in the hall, The pictures of Egypt are bright on the wall, My sweet, I am standing beside the oak stair And there on the landing's the light on your hair. By roads 'not adopted', by woodlanded ways, She drove to the club in the late summer haze, Into nine-o'clock Camberley, heavy with bells And mushroomy, pine-woody, evergreen smells. Miss Joan Hunter Dunn, Miss Joan Hunter Dunn, I can hear from the car-park the dance has begun. Oh! full Surrey twilight! importunate band! Oh! strongly adorable tennis-girl's hand! Around us are Rovers and Austins afar, Above us, the intimate roof of the car, And here on my right is the girl of my choice, With the tilt of her nose and the chime of her voice, And the scent of her wrap, and the words never said, And the ominous, ominous dancing ahead. We sat in the car park till twenty to one And now I'm engaged to Miss Joan Hunter Dunn.
A Subaltern’s Love Song
Filia Venanti, castris te finxit Apollo,     tinxit et aere artus, pinxit et arte genas. strinximus undecima clavas (pila pellitur!) hora,     altera tu vehemens, strenuus alter ego! tu superas pueros motu, cita qualis hirundo:     laetor, inops puncti; ter, quater ipsa notas. risisti, pariter secura ac sedula victrix:     conficior forma, pulchra Atalanta, tua. filia Venanti, Venanti filia nostri,     palma tua est: uror, laetor, amore feror! conditur in prelum capulo modo clava tepente,     sed mea me victrix (stat coma!) semper amat. tendimus ad patrem. Venanti euonymus albet;     fundimus incepta, qua casa, verba via; porticus excepit zephyris; nova nuntiat aether;     iuniperus tilia tingitur, apta bibi. sub thalamo lucet maculoso semita musco;     calda aqua mi resonat; conifer hortus olet. papilione agitor duplici: fas cingere collum!     haud aequi petimus, qua pila parva, choros. at tua braca chlamysque iacent, thalamique renidet     pariete lacteola plurima palma pilae. sol tetigitque trabem tingitque, Atalanta, fenestram:     occidit, exquirens quid tibi fata parent. Niliacae splendent species in pariete pictae:     aula micat taedis: nos rota parva manet. quernus ubi gradus est, ibi sum; laqueata supersunt,     crine refulgenti qua, mea vita, nites. autumno petimus - lora ipsa dat - aere turbam,     quo nemore, aedilis, non tua cura via est! venimus in vicum sero multum aere sonantem;     boleti et viridi germine pinus olent. filia Venanti, Venanti filia nostri,     sistimus: ingeminat coeptus in aure chorus. tibia nil cessans! perfecta crepuscula campi!     laetor, Amazoniam me tetigisse manum. undique circumstant bigae, procul undique currus;     clam nos sub grato culmine noster habet: naribus incurvis capior vocisque canore:     unica mi laevo dextra puella sedet. ecquid haruspicii vetat adfectare choreos?     fragrat odor pallae: conscia lingua tacet! quattuor in curru sub nocte remansimus horas,     tempore et ex illo sponsa Atalanta mihist.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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I Don’t Know Which Direction the Wind is Blowing

Categories
Latin

I Don’t Know Which Direction the Wind is Blowing

Xu Zhimo (1897-1931)

Latin Version by Timothy Adès
I don’t know Which direction the wind is blowing - I am in a dream, In the dream’s gentle wave lingering. I don’t know Which direction the wind is blowing - I am in a dream, Her tenderness, my fascination. I don’t know Which direction the wind is blowing - I am in a dream, Sweetness is the glory of the dream. I don’t know Which direction the wind is blowing - I am in a dream, Her betrayal, my depression. I don’t know Which direction the wind is blowing - I am in a dream, Heartbroken in the gloom of the dream. I don’t know Which direction the wind is blowing - I am in a dream, Dimness is the glory of the dream.
I Don’t Know Which Direction the Wind is Blowing
nescioquo tendunt venti: vagor incola somni.   undulat ut somnus, lene liquore moror. nescioquo tendunt venti: vagor incola somni.   quippe puella bonast: captor et allicior. nescioquo tendunt venti: vagor incola somni.   dulcedo, somni gloria magna mei! nescioquo tendunt venti: vagor incola somni.   tristitiam tradit falsa puella mihi. nescioquo tendunt venti: vagor incola somni.   in somni tenebris torqueor, excrucior. nescioquo tendunt venti: vagor incola somni.   caligo, somni gloria maesta mei!

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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My Latin version

Adlestrop

Edward Thomas (1878-1917)

Adlestrop
Yes. I remember Adlestrop— The name, because one afternoon Of heat the express-train drew up there Unwontedly. It was late June. The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat. No one left and no one came On the bare platform. What I saw Was Adlestrop—only the name And willows, willow-herb, and grass, And meadowsweet, and haycocks dry, No whit less still and lonely fair Than the high cloudlets in the sky. And for that minute a blackbird sang Close by, and round him, mistier, Farther and farther, all the birds Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.
My Latin version
non mihi mente tuum cadit indelebile nomen, ~~Selda, ubi inassueta compede currus iter sisterat. excelso tempestas torrida sole, ~~deficiens mensis Junius, alta dies. sibilat aere vapor, purgat mala gutture tussis; ~~nullus homo venit limine, nullus abit. solum, Selda, tuum nomen, tu portus amoene, ~~nil aliud visumst! herba humilisque salix et grandes salices, ulmaria pendula filis ~~flos redolens, foeni plurima congeries, arida, sola, nitens, immota ut in aere nubes ~~exiguae; gaudes voce propinqua brevi tu, merula! et procul hinc, ubi iam nebulosior aer, ~~pinnati numerant carmina grata chori, argutae volucrum quot habes, Oxonia, turbae, ~~quot regio Glevi Nervia condit aves.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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Sea Fever

John Masefield (1878-1967)

Sea Fever
I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking, And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.   I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying, And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.   I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife; And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.
quo sitis ire mihi, nihil est nisi pontus et aer. ~~ nave petam celsa sidere fisus aquas! vela tremant, sonet Eurus, agat vis torva gubernum, ~~sit nova pulla dies, acre vapore mare. exagitant clarae surgenti gurgite voces: ~~Tethyos infaustum iussa negare deae! hoc satis est: canis moveantur nubibus aurae, ~~spuma volet ventis, carmine mergus ovet. me, Neptune, iuvant via mergi parsque balaenae, ~~ vita peregrini, saevior Eurus acu. sint mihi sermones hilares comitisque cachinni, ~~et, cum res fuerit, somnia amoena, sopor.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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