IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI

Death and The Maiden: an Acrostic

Bethany W Pope (1995)

The poet’s acrostic project involves “four deconstructed acrostic sestinas, twenty-four double-acrostic sonnets, and an acrostic specular. The story is orphic.” This is the acrostic specular at the centre of her project.
Death and The Maiden: an Acrostic
In the house of Death pain and pleasure are one. Never mind the face he wears; those bare sockets, that sharp grin. Grasp him, hard. Push against those jutting hip bones. In this tangle of sheets (scented with sex and rot) Reason dissolves like bone in acid, revealing something else Under the mask. There is something beautiful, Madness, perhaps, or possibly truth. In the joyful agony of this moment a revelation blooms. Muscles crowd in to cover the bone. Naked, Under a sheen of silk and lily-dew, Skeletal hands clutch fat, round paps. Nearing the threshold of something unspeakable, Open your eyes; behold your lover. Tension Contorts the fibers of your heart. Trembling limbs threaded together; a blissful arrhythmia. Even Death can learn the pleasure of a shudder. Even Death can learn the pleasure of a shudder. Trembling limbs threaded together; a blissful arrhythmia Contorts the fibers of your heart. Open your eyes. Behold your lover; tension. Nearing the threshold of something unspeakable, Skeletal hands clutch fat, round paps. Under a sheen of silk and lily-dew, Muscles crowd in to cover the bone. Naked In the joyful agony of this moment, a revelation blooms. Madness, perhaps, or possibly truth. Under the mask there is something beautiful. Reason dissolves like bone in acid, revealing something else. In this tangle of sheets (scented with sex and rot) Grasp him, hard. Push against those jutting hip bones; Never mind the face he wears. Those bare sockets; that sharp grin. In the house of Death pain and pleasure are one.
IN GIRUM IMUS NOCTE ET CONSUMIMUR IGNI
In Mortis aede mel dolor, fel gaudium. Ne terreant te rictus, orbes, os grave: Grande prehendas, pelvis ossa comprimas. Instat libido putris in linis odor. Recincta mens ut ossa aceto: ostenditur, Ut excidit persona, pulchritudinis Merum, et furoris, veritatis omina. In his doloris gaudiis mens certior: Miscentur ossi muscula et nuda omnia: Udis sub ortus palliis cum lilio Surgunt papillae quas premunt durae manus. Nefanda sunt propinqua: vade ad limina! Orbes recludens ipsum amatorem vide! Cordis toros contorquet incitatio. Tremunt beati ardoris artus artubus. Et Mors voluptatem tremoris excipit. Et Mors voluptatem tremoris excipit. Tremunt beati ardoris artus artubus. Cordis toros contorquet incitatio. Orbes recludens ipsum amatorem vide! Nefanda sunt propinqua: vade ad limina! Surgunt papillae quas premunt durae manus. Udis sub ortus palliis cum lilio Miscentur ossi muscula et nuda omnia: In his doloris gaudiis mens certior: Merum, et furoris, veritatis omina, Ut excidit persona, pulchritudinis. Recincta mens ut ossa aceto ostenditur. Instat libido putris in linis odor. Grande prehendas, pelvis ossa comprimas. Ne terreant te rictus, orbes, os grave: In Mortis aede mel dolor, fel gaudium.
Death And The Maiden

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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Latin

From: Doggerel by a Senior Citizen

W.H. Auden (1907-73)

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Sir John Betjeman (1906-84)

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Xu Zhimo (1897-1931)

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John Masefield (1878-1967)

Sea Fever
I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; And the wheel’s kick and the wind’s song and the white sail’s shaking, And a grey mist on the sea’s face, and a grey dawn breaking.   I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying, And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.   I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, To the gull’s way and the whale’s way where the wind’s like a whetted knife; And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over.
quo sitis ire mihi, nihil est nisi pontus et aer. ~~ nave petam celsa sidere fisus aquas! vela tremant, sonet Eurus, agat vis torva gubernum, ~~sit nova pulla dies, acre vapore mare. exagitant clarae surgenti gurgite voces: ~~Tethyos infaustum iussa negare deae! hoc satis est: canis moveantur nubibus aurae, ~~spuma volet ventis, carmine mergus ovet. me, Neptune, iuvant via mergi parsque balaenae, ~~ vita peregrini, saevior Eurus acu. sint mihi sermones hilares comitisque cachinni, ~~et, cum res fuerit, somnia amoena, sopor.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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Latin

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G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

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Latin

The Donkey

G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

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My Old Man Said ‘Follow the Van...’

Fred W. Leigh (1871-1924) and Charles Collins (1874-1923)

My Old Man Said ‘Follow the Van...’
‘i, sequere’ inquit erus ‘pantechnicon, impigra cursu.’     plaustrum abiit; veterem constat abisse domum. en sequor, en sequitur passer meus ille canorus,     sed pigra, sed pigro corde soluta vagor, nescio qua. vigili suffecto credere noli!     quae via sit, fallor; fallit adempta domus.
My old man said "Follow the van, And don't dilly dally on the way". Off went the van wiv me 'ome packed in it, I followed on wiv me old cock linnet. But I dillied and dallied, dallied and dillied Lost me way and don't know where to roam. Well you can't trust a special like the old time coppers When you can't find your way 'ome.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

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Hilaire Belloc (1870-1953)

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Laurence Binyon

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