Hibernia nostra

Let Erin Remember

My Latin
Let Erin Remember
Let Erin remember the days of old, Ere her faithless sons betray'd her; When Malachi wore the collar of gold, Which he won from her proud invader, When her kings, with standard of green unfurl'd, Led the Red-Branch Knights to danger! Ere the emerald gem of the western world Was set in the crown of a stranger. On Lough Neagh's bank as the fisherman strays, When the clear cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days In the wave beneath him shining: Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, Catch a glimpse of the days that are over; Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time, For the long-faded glories they cover.
Hibernia nostra
tempora lapsa diu memorentur, Hibernia nostra, queis te tradiderat nondum tua perfida proles. supremum regem signaverat aurea torques, invasore truci victorem in lite superbo: tempore quo viridi regum vexilla colore audendis equites rutilos duxere periclis, Hesperiae necdum Smaragditia gemma iacebat capta per externos, aliena inserta corona. est lacus insignis: ripa piscator in alta, solis ad occasum deerrans per frigus et umbram, viderit antiquas torres praestare rotundas, surgere fulgentes et aqua lucere profunda. sic etiam referent sublimia somnia menti grandia tempora, lapsorum simulacra dierum: vanescunt refugis aevis moribunda per undas, in queis iamdudum se pristina gloria condit.
Sung by Michael O’Duffy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtPsezf6qn0

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

The Women of Weinsberg

Die Weiber von Weinsberg

Adelbert von Chamisso (1781-1838)

Die Weiber von Weinsberg
Der erste Hohenstaufen, der König Konrad lag Mit Heeresmacht vor Winsperg seit manchem langen Tag. Der Welfe war geschlagen, noch wehrte sich das Nest, Die unverzagten Städter, die hielten es noch fest. Der Hunger kam, der Hunger! das ist ein scharfer Dorn! Nun suchten sie die Gnade, nun trafen sie den Zorn: „Ihr hab mir hier erschlagen. gar manchen Degen wert, Und öffnet ihr die Tore, so trifft euch doch das Schwert.“ Da sind die Weiber kommen: „Und muss es also sein, Gewährt uns freien Abzug, wir sind vom Blute rein. “Da hat sich vor den Armen des Helden Zorn gekühlt, Da hat ein sanft Erbarmen im Herzen er gefühlt. „Die Weiber mögen abziehn und jede habe frei, Was sie vermag zu tragen und ihr das Liebste sei; Lasst ziehn mit ihrer Bürde sie ungehindert fort, Das ist des Königs Meinung, das ist des Königs Wort.“ Und als der frühe Morgen im Osten kam gegraut, Da hat ein seltnes Schauspiel vom Lager man geschaut; Es öffnet leise, leise sich das bedrängte Tor, Es schwankt ein Zug von Weibern mit schwerem Schritt hervor. Tief beugt die Last sie nieder, die auf dem Nacken ruht, Sie tragen ihre Eh’herrn, das ist ihr liebstes Gut. „Halt an die argen Weiber!“, ruft drohend mancher Wicht; - Der Kanzler spricht bedeutsam: „Das war die Meinung nicht." Da hat, wie er’s vernommen, der fromme Herr gelacht: „Und war es nicht die Meinung, sie haben’s gut gemacht; Gesprochen ist gesprochen, das Königswort besteht, Und zwar von keinem Kanzler zerdeutelt und zerdreht.“ So war das Gold der Krone wohl rein und unentweiht. Die Sage schallt herüber aus halbvergessner Zeit. Im Jahr elfhundert vierzig, wie ich’s verzeichnet fand, Galt Königswort noch heilig im deutschen Vaterland.
The Women of Weinsberg
First of the Hohenstaufen, the bold King Conrad lay Encamped in force at Weinsberg for many a weary day. The Guelph he had defeated; this eyrie still gave fight; The burghers kept their courage, and held the fortress tight. Came hunger then, came hunger, that sharp and painful thorn; They came to him for mercy, and found his rage and scorn. ‘Ye’ve slain full many a gallant; expect your just reward; ‘Tis vain your gates to open; your portion is the sword’. Then came to him the women: ‘And if it must be so, Guiltless are we of slaughter; then let us freely go.’ And when he heard their pleading, the hero’s rage was quelled; Instead within his bosom a soft compassion swelled. ‘The women have safe conduct, and each may carry free Whatever she can shoulder that dear to her may be. Let them proceed unhindered, and bear away their load; So let it be, for such is our royal will and word!’ And as the early morning rose in the East so grey, Strange was the scene they witnessed, who in the siege-camp lay: From that beleaguered gateway that slowly opened wide, A swaying line of women came forth with awkward stride. The load their necks supported, it bent them to the ground: They bore their lords and masters, the dearest thing they owned. ‘Arrest the caitiff women!’- harsh cries and threats were heard; ‘This never was intended!’ the chancellor averred. He smiled when he beheld it, the just and pious King; ‘Perhaps I never willed it, yet here’s a noble thing! A promise is a promise; the royal word holds good, By chancellors not ever misprised or misconstrued.’ And so the royal crown of gold was pure and undefiled: The year, eleven forty, by our chroniclers compiled. From half-forgotten ages still we hear the story ring: Sacred in German homeland was the promise of a King.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Adelbert von Chamisso...

Tagus, Farewell

Tagus, Farewell

Thomas Wyatt

The Ambassador goes home from Spain, 1539: his English, my Latin
Tagus, Farewell
Tagus, farewell! that westward with thy streams Turns up the grains of gold already tried With spur and sail, for I go seek the Thames Gainward the sun that shewth her wealthy pride, And to the town which Brutus sought by dreams, Like bended moon doth lend her lusty side. My king, my country, alone for whome I live, Of mighty love the wings for this me give.
Tagus, Farewell
aurea qui, Tage, grana probas et flumine versas, qui petis occasum solis, Ibere, vale: namque peto Tamesim velo et calcare profectus; ad solem tendens ille superbit ope, et permit exsultans quam somnis quaesiit urbem Brutus, ut incurvat luna bicorne latus. vos lux una meaea princeps et patria vitae, ingenti hinc per vos ales amore feror.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Thomas Wyatt...