St Helena

Ste-Hélène

Victor Hugo (1802-85)

Third poem in L'Expiation, following Moscow and Waterloo. All published by The Napoleonic Society of America, and in Translation and Literature (Edinburgh U.P.)
Ste-Hélène
Il croula. Dieu changea la chaîne de l’Europe. Il est, au fond des mers que la brume enveloppe, Un roc hideux, débris des antiques volcans. Le Destin prit des clous, un marteau, des carcans, Saisit, pâle et vivant, ce voleur du tonnerre, Et, joyeux, s’en alla sur le pic centenaire Le clouer, excitant par son rire moqueur Le vautour Angleterre à lui ronger le cœur. Évanouissement d’une splendeur immense ! Du soleil qui se lève à la nuit qui commence, Toujours l’isolement, l’abandon, la prison, Un soldat rouge au seuil, la mer à l’horizon, Des rochers nus, des bois affreux, l’ennui, l’espace, Des voiles s’enfuyant comme l’espoir qui passe, Toujours le bruit des flots, toujours le bruit des vents ! Adieu, tente de pourpre aux panaches mouvants, Adieu, le cheval blanc que César éperonne ! Plus de tambours battant aux champs, plus de couronne, Plus de rois prosternés dans l’ombre avec terreur, Plus de manteau traînant sur eux, plus d’empereur ! Napoléon était retombé Bonaparte. Comme un romain blessé par la flèche du Parthe, Saignant, morne, il songeait à Moscou qui brûla. Un caporal anglais lui disait : halte-là ! Son fils aux mains des rois ! sa femme aux bras d’un autre ! Plus vil que le pourceau qui dans l’égout se vautre, Son sénat qui l’avait adoré l’insultait. Au bord des mers, à l’heure où la bise se tait, Sur les escarpements croulant en noirs décombres, Il marchait, seul, rêveur, captif des vagues sombres. Sur les monts, sur les flots, sur les cieux, triste et fier, L’œil encore ébloui des batailles d’hier, Il laissait sa pensée errer à l’aventure. Grandeur, gloire, ô néant ! calme de la nature ! Les aigles qui passaient ne le connaissaient pas. Les rois, ses guichetiers, avaient pris un compas Et l’avaient enfermé dans un cercle inflexible. Il expirait. La mort de plus en plus visible Se levait dans sa nuit et croissait à ses yeux Comme le froid matin d’un jour mystérieux. Son âme palpitait, déjà presque échappée. Un jour enfin il mit sur son lit son épée, Et se coucha près d’elle, et dit : « C’est aujourd’hui » On jeta le manteau de Marengo sur lui. Ses batailles du Nil, du Danube, du Tibre, Se penchaient sur son front, il dit : « Me voici libre ! Je suis vainqueur ! je vois mes aigles accourir ! » Et, comme il retournait sa tête pour mourir, Il aperçut, un pied dans la maison déserte, Hudson Lowe guettant par la porte entrouverte. Alors, géant broyé sous le talon des rois, Il cria : « La mesure est comble cette fois ! Seigneur ! c’est maintenant fini ! Dieu que j’implore, Vous m’avez châtié ! » La voix dit : Pas encore !
St Helena
He fell; and God changed Europe's iron bands. Far in the fog-bound seas a vile rock stands, Belched up by old volcanoes. Destiny Took nails and clamps and neck-irons, gleefully, Seized him who stole the thunder, living, pale, And dragged him to the grizzled peak, to nail Him down, and with a mocking laugh to start The vulture England gnawing at his heart. * Immeasurable splendour, passed away! From earliest sunrise till the end of day Ever alone, abandoned, caged in prison; A redcoat near; beyond, the sea's horizon. Bare rocks, grim woods, depression, emptiness: Sails passing, fleeing into hopelessness. The sound of winds and waves for evermore! Farewell, white horse that Caesar spurs to war, Farewell the pounding drums, the stratagem, The purple tent, the plumes, the diadem! No quaking prostrate kings inferior; No robe trailed over them; no emperor. Napoleon was reduced to Bonaparte. He thought of Moscow burning, sick at heart As Roman bleeding from the Parthian bolt: An English corporal, to bid him Halt! Kings held his son; his wife was spoken for; Worse than a pig that wallows in a sewer, His senate cursed him, worshipping no more. When ocean winds fall still, he walked the shore On cliffs that crumbled in black heaps of stone, The dark waves' captive, dreaming and alone. As bygone battles still amazed his eye, With rueful pride on hill and sea and sky He cast his thoughts, to stray on high adventure. Grandeur and glory, void! the calm of nature! Eagles pass by, not knowing who he is. The kings, his jailers, took their compasses And closed him in a ring inflexible. He sickened. Death more and more visible Rose in the night and grew before his eyes, Like the cold breaking of a strange sunrise. His soul, that fluttered still, was almost fled. At last he laid his sword upon his bed, And took his place, and said `This is the day'. The greatcoat of Marengo on him lay. Nile, Danube, Tiber: battles on his brow Gathered. Said he: `I am unfettered now! I am victorious! Come, my eagles, fly!' And as he turned his head aside to die, Intruding in the empty house he saw Hudson Lowe watching through the half-closed door. The kings beneath their heel had trampled him! `Full measure!' cried the giant; `to the brim! Now it is finished! God whom I implore, Thy chastening's done!' The voice said, `There is More!'

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Victor Hugo...

The Boy on the Moor

Der Knabe im Moor

Annette von Droste-Hülshoff (1797-1848)

Der Knabe im Moor
O schaurig ist's übers Moor zu gehn, Wenn es wimmelt vom Heiderauche, Sich wie Phantome die Dünste drehn Und die Ranke häkelt am Strauche, Unter jedem Tritte ein Quellchen springt, Wenn aus der Spalte es zischt und singt! – O schaurig ist's übers Moor zu gehn, Wenn das Röhricht knistert im Hauche! Fest hält die Fibel das zitternde Kind Und rennt, als ob man es jage; Hohl über die Fläche sauset der Wind – Was raschelt drüben am Hage? Das ist der gespenstische Gräberknecht, Der dem Meister die besten Torfe verzecht; Hu, hu, es bricht wie ein irres Rind! Hinducket das Knäblein zage. Vom Ufer starret Gestumpf hervor, Unheimlich nicket die Föhre, Der Knabe rennt, gespannt das Ohr, Durch Riesenhalme wie Speere; Und wie es rieselt und knittert darin! Das ist die unselige Spinnerin, Das ist die gebannte Spinnenlenor', Die den Haspel dreht im Geröhre! Voran, voran! Nur immer im Lauf, Voran, als woll es ihn holen! Vor seinem Fuße brodelt es auf, Es pfeift ihm unter den Sohlen, Wie eine gespenstige Melodei; Das ist der Geigemann ungetreu, Das ist der diebische Fiedler Knauf, Der den Hochzeitheller gestohlen! Da birst das Moor, ein Seufzer geht Hervor aus der klaffenden Höhle; Weh, weh, da ruft die verdammte Margret: „Ho, ho, meine arme Seele!“ Der Knabe springt wie ein wundes Reh; Wär nicht Schutzengel in seiner Näh, Seine bleichenden Knöchelchen fände spät Ein Gräber im Moorgeschwele. Da mählich gründet der Boden sich, Und drüben, neben der Weide, Die Lampe flimmert so heimatlich, Der Knabe steht an der Scheide. Tief atmet er auf, zum Moor zurück Noch immer wirft er den scheuen Blick: Ja, im Geröhre war's fürchterlich, O schaurig war's in der Heide.
The Boy on the Moor
O frightful to cross is the bog on the heath When it’s foul with the moorland’s breathing, The mists are swirling like spectres of death And the tendrils of thickets come creeping, When at every footstep a rivulet springs As out of the fissure it surges and sings And the reeds in the gusts are creaking! He is clutching his schoolbook, the shuddering child, As if hunted down, he is hustling. The wind on the plain whistles hollow and wild! What is that in the hedgerows rustling? O that is the spadesman ghastly-grey Who drinks the master’s fine peat away: And it sounds like a furious bull’s rampage To the cowering, terrified stripling. The boy is running, he pricks up his ears! Stumps loom at the fringe, decaying; He is deep among rushes tall as spears, The pine-tree is eerily swaying. There’s trickling and crackling, loud to hear, And the lass who must spin, the poor Lenore, Bewitched and hapless for evermore, Her bobbin in the reeds rotating! Onward, onward he races and runs, As if it is coming to catch him! At the fall of his foot it bubbles and brims, Beneath his soles it is whistling. It is like the sound of a song of death: It is Knauf, the fiddler of broken faith, It is he who stole it, the faithless thief, Stole the penny away from the wedding. The bog gives way and the ground has burst With horrible groaning asunder! Wail woe, wail woe, ‘tis Mad Meg the Accursed, Crying out, ‘My poor soul, you shall founder!’ The boy leaps up like a wounded deer: If his guardian angel were not near, His bleaching bones in the mouldering mire The spadesman at last would encounter. But slowly now by the willow tree The ground begins to harden. The lamplight twinkles so cosily, And the boy stands safe on the margin. He is breathing deep, it no longer appals, Yet his glance on the moorland backward falls: O how frightful it was, with dread he recalls, The heath and its quaking midden!

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Annette von Droste-Hülshoff...

Lines Written on a Young Lady’s Album

Vers écrits sur l'album d'une jeune dame

Alphonse de Lamartine (1790-1869)

Vers écrits sur l'album d'une jeune dame
Sur cette page blanche où mes vers vont éclore, qu'un souvenir parfois ramène votre coeur! De votre vie aussi la page est blanche encore; je voudrais la remplir d'un seul mot: le Bonheur. Le livre de la vie est un livre suprême, que l'on ne peut fermer ni rouvrir à son choix, Où le feuillet fatal se tourne de lui-même; le passage attachant ne s'y lit qu'une fois: on voudrait s'arrêter à la page où on l'aime, et la page où l'on meurt est déjà sous les doigts.
Lines Written on a Young Lady’s Album
To this blank page, which now my verses fill, haply shall memory bid your heart regress. Your own life’s page is blank and empty still: there would I write the sole word ‘Happiness’. The book of life’s a great and final book; you cannot take it to and from the shelf. At a choice passage there’s no second look: the leaf of fate turns over by itself. We’d gladly linger on the page, ‘A Lover’; under our hands, behold! we read: ‘All Over!’

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Alphonse de Lamartine...

I dreamed...

Mir träumt’...

Joseph von Eichendorff (1788-1857)

Mir träumt’...
Mir träumt’, ich ruhte wieder Vor meines Vaters Haus Und schaute fröhlich nieder Ins alte Tal hinaus, Die Luft mit lindem Spielen Ging durch das Frühlingslaub, Und Blütenflocken fielen Mir über Brust und Haupt. Als ich erwacht, da schimmert Der Mond vom Waldesrand, Im falben Scheine flimmert Um mich ein fremdes Land, Und wie ich ringsher sehe: Die Flocken waren Eis, Die Gegend war vom Schnee, Mein Haar vom Alter weiß.
I dreamed...
I dreamed again I rested Outside my father’s home And, joyful, down the valley Allowed my eyes to roam. The breeze in vernal bowers Sported with gentle jest And blossoms shed their petals About my head and breast. I saw the moon that shimmered From where the tall trees stand: In the pale light there glimmered, All round, a foreign land: And as I looked about me, The petals were ice-cold, All snowy was the country, And I was grey and old.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Joseph von Eichendorff...

Moonlit Night

Mondnacht

Joseph von Eichendorff (1788-1857)

Mondnacht
Es war, als hätt’ der Himmel Die Erde still geküßt, Daß sie im Blütenschimmer Von ihm nur träumen müßt'. Die Luft ging durch die Felder, Die Ähren wogten sacht, Es rauschten leis’ die Wälder, So sternklar war die Nacht. Und meine Seele spannte Weit ihre Flügel aus, Flog durch die stillen Lande, Als flöge sie nach Haus.
Moonlit Night
It seemed the gallant heaven Gave earth a silent kiss, That she so bright with flowers Must only dream of this. The breeze amid the harvest Caressed the waving corn. The woodland whispered softly, The starry midnight shone. My soul spread wide her pinions, No longer fain to roam, Flew through the silent landscape As one who heads for home.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WruxiZu_2A

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Joseph von Eichendorff...

Lost

Verloren

Joseph von Eichendorff (1788-1857)

Verloren
Still bei Nacht fährt manches Schiff, Meerfey kämmt ihr Haar am Riff, Hebt von Inseln an zu singen, Die im Meer dort untergingen. Wann die Morgenwinde wehn, Ist nicht Riff noch Fey zu sehn, Und das Schifflein ist versunken, Und der Schiffer ist ertrunken.
Lost
Quiet night, and boats are roaming, Mermaid on an islet combing, From the reef she starts to sing, Which is sinking, vanishing. Come the gentle winds of dawn, Reef and mermaid both are gone, Boat has shattered on the reef, Boat and sailor come to grief.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Joseph von Eichendorff...

Words in the Wood

Waldesgespräch

Joseph von Eichendorff (1788-1857)

Waldesgespräch
Es ist schon spät, es ist schon kalt, Was reit’st du einsam durch den Wald? Der Wald ist lang, du bist allein, Du schöne Braut! Ich führ’ dich heim! „Groß ist der Männer Trug und List, Vor Schmerz mein Herz gebrochen ist, Wohl irrt das Waldhorn her und hin, O flieh! Du weißt nicht, wer ich bin.“ So reich geschmückt ist Roß und Weib, So wunderschön der junge Leib, Jetzt kenn’ ich dich—Gott steh’ mir bei! Du bist die Hexe Loreley. „Du kennst mich wohl—von hohem Stein Schaut still mein Schloß tief in den Rhein. Es ist schon spät, es ist schon kalt, Kommst nimmermehr aus diesem Wald!“
Words in the Wood
‘The hour is late, the glow is gone, And through the wood you ride alone. No friend at hand, the wood is wide, I’ll bring you home, you lovely bride.’ ‘Men have such cunning to deceive. They broke my heart, I burn, I grieve. The wood-horn’s echoes come and go. Flee! I am one you do not know.’ ‘Both horse and lady richly dight, Fair form of youth, a noble sight. I know you now – pray God be nigh! You are the demon Lorelei!’ ‘You know me well! That hall is mine, That waits and broods above the Rhine. The hour is late, the glow is gone, Here you shall stay, my thrall, my own!’

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Joseph von Eichendorff...

Half of Life

Hälfte des Lebens

Friedrich Hölderlin (1770-1843)

Hälfte des Lebens was one of the poems offered on the website of the wonderful magazine Modern Poetry in Translation as a project for translators. I contributed these three versions: one is in Latin elegiac couplets and one is a lipogram, avoiding the letter E.
Hälfte des Lebens
Mit gelben Birnen hänget Und voll mit wilden Rosen Das Land in den See, Ihr holden Schwäne, Und trunken von Küssen Tunkt ihr das Haupt Ins heilignüchterne Wasser. Weh mir, wo nehm’ ich, wenn Es Winter ist, die Blumen, und wo Den Sonnenschein, Und Schatten der Erde? Die Mauern stehn Sprachlos und kalt, im Winde Klirren die Fahnen. Dimidium Vitae flava pirus, rosa silvarum: defertur onusta ~~terra superficie lapsa lacustris aquae. suaviolis olor ebrius it: fas dedere collum: ~~sobrius in sacrum dat caput ire lacum. e nive qua capiam flores, vim solis, et umbram? ~~signa aquilone sonant; moenia muta rigent.
Half of Life
Golden pears, roses wild, slippety–slip, land leaning lakeward; swans’–faces, kissy–drunk, dippety–dip, depth sober–sacred. O how’ll I find, come winter, flowers, sunbeams, earth–shadow? Walls dumb and numb, banners and vanes shake, clack and rattle. A Half of Living Gold Williams fruit and wild triantaphylls: Land tilts towards Loch Lomond, almost spills: You snazzy swans, half–cut with kissing bills, In pious prosy liquid dunk your skulls! O how’ll I find blossoms among snowfalls, Warm rays of sun, shadows that land on soils? Our flaps and flags clack; dumb and numb our walls.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Friedrich Hölderlin...

The Gods of Greece

Die Götter Griechenlands

Friedrich von Schiller (1759-1805)

Die Götter Griechenlands
Schöne Welt, wo bist du? Kehre wieder Holdes Blütenalter der Natur! Ach, nur in dem Feenland der Lieder Lebt noch deine fabelhafte Spur. Ausgestorben trauert das Gefilde, Keine Gottheit zeigt sich meinem Blick, Ach, von jenem lebenwarmen Bilde Blieb der Schatten nur zurück.
The Gods of Greece
Most beauteous world, where may you be? Nature’s bright springtime, come again! Only in fairy minstrelsy Your storied memories remain. The field has faded and is keening, No god reveals to me his form: Only the shadow still remaining, The vision once alive and warm.
Set by Schubert: Ian Bostridge https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdkDyMs7xXM (or other singers))

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Friedrich von Schiller...

Sonnets of Virtuous Love - 10

Sonnets de l'honnête amour -10

Joachim du Bellay (1522-60)

Sonnets de l'honnête amour -10
J'ai entassé moi-même tout le bois Pour allumer cette flamme immortelle, Par qui mon âme avecques plus haute aile Se guinde au ciel, d'un égal contrepoids. Jà mon esprit, jà mon coeur, jà ma voix, Jà mon amour conçoit forme nouvelle D'une beauté plus parfaitement belle Que le fin or épuré par sept fois. Rien de mortel ma langue plus ne sonne: Jà peu à peu moi-même j'abandonne Par cette ardeur, qui me fait sembler tel Que se montrait l'indompté fils d'Alcmène, Qui, dédaignant notre figure humaine, Brûla son corps, pour se rendre immortel.
Sonnets of Virtuous Love - 10
Myself I've heaped the wood up high to kindle this immortal flame. My soul on soaring wing shall fly to heaven, for the weight's the same. My heart, my voice, my love, my mind, shall greater comeliness acquire than gold in seven shifts refined. I slowly yield me to the fire, and cease from mortal colloquy. Like the unconquered god am I, Alcmena's Hercules, who spurned our human shape, whose body burned, who gained his immortality.

Translation: Copyright © Timothy Adès

More poems by Joachim du Bellay...